The Raging Hormone Myth? What Science Has to Say about Women, Hormones, and Emotion
Friday, September 30, 2016 at 02:49PM
nycskeptics

When: Saturday, October 22, 2016 @ 3:00 PM 
Where: Lawrence and Eris Field Building, Baruch College, 17 Lexington Ave., Room 306 (The "Skylight Room")

Are women at the whim of their hormones? PMS, and the extended idea that women’s mental health is threatened by any changes in reproductive hormones, continues to abound in American culture.  Despite decades of methodologically strong research establishing the limited to non-existent contribution of reproductive hormones to psychopathology in women, the concept of women as occasional hormonal lunatics persists. The hardiness of the hormone myth has benefited several parties, including the medical field, the pharmaceutical industry, psychologists, and anyone who sees an advantage in keeping women in traditional gender roles.

The hormone myth has produced billions in revenue for pharmaceutical companies who have convinced women they need to be on hormones to maintain health for decades of their lives, and for the physicians who prescribe them. A whole cottage industry of books, websites, and seminars for women thrives with the help of the hormone myth. Robyn Stein DeLuca says the myth has hurt women in a variety of ways: It contributes to the idea that women’s reproductive events are illnesses requiring treatment, exposing them to unnecessary and sometimes harmful interventions. It also reinforces gender stereotypes of women as biological, emotional and unreliable, and men as rational, logical, and steady. Finally, it keeps women from addressing the actual issues that cause them emotional upset, which are much more likely to be socially-based than hormonally-based.

Robyn Stein DeLuca has a Ph.D. in Health Psychology with a graduate certificate in Women’s Studies, and was a core faculty member in the Women’s and Gender Studies Program at Stony Brook University for 15 years. She taught a multitude of courses on the psychology of health, gender, and reproduction. Her research on postpartum depression and childbirth satisfaction has been published in journals like the Journal of Clinical and Consulting Psychology and Social Science and Medicine. She currently holds the title of Research Assistant Professor in the Stony Brook Psychology Dept.

 During her time at Stony Brook, Prof. DeLuca served for two years as the Executive Director of the Women in Science and Engineering (WISE) program at Stony Brook University, a program that provides mentoring, research opportunities, and scholarships to young women showing promise in science, technology, engineering, and math. 

In November 2014, Prof. DeLuca gave a Tedx talk titled “The Good News About PMS” which now has over one million views. Her book, The Hormone Myth will be published by New Harbinger Publications in May 2017.

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